Workshops and Retreats

CWSC evidence-based workshops are open to postdoctoral fellows from across the disciplines and professions.

Upcoming Workshops

Workshop Roster

Abstracts: Writing

Research article, conference, and thesis abstracts play a vital role in the communication of research. Studies show that abstracts are the most frequently read part of a research article, and that abstracts help researchers determine whether or not to read the entire study. But how do writers communicate the relevance and legitimacy of their research to members of the discipline?

This workshop introduces researchers to two typical structures of abstracts, while accounting for differences in disciplines and purposes. Participants will write or revise an abstract (e.g., research article, conference, thesis), and receive feedback from the workshop facilitators and other participants. Therefore, this workshop is most useful for those with a research project underway

Lay Summaries: Writing

Lay summaries offer researchers opportunities to increase the visibility and accessibility of their scientific studies and thus invite public dialogue. As a way to promote science communication, many open access journals, public policy institutes, and granting agencies require researchers to provide summaries of their studies for non-specialists. But how do experts communicate specialized research to non-specialist audiences, and why?

This workshop introduces graduate researchers to some of the ways in which lay summaries differ from scientific abstracts, the multiple purposes of lay summaries, and how lay summaries enhance science communication. Workshop participants will bring a draft lay summary to revise during dedicated writing time and receive feedback from peers and the workshop facilitator.

Literature Reviews: Writing

Thesis and research article literature reviews accomplish several purposes for scholars. In the introduction, for example, writers review relevant research in order to establish a research gap or knowledge deficit that the current study addresses. But how do writers summarize the scholarly conversation already underway and, then, join that conversation?

This workshop introduces researchers to the typical structure of the literature review in thesis and research article introductions, while accounting for variation in communicative purposes and disciplinary differences. Participants will write or revise a literature review (thesis, dissertation, research article), and receive feedback from the workshop facilitators and other participants. Therefore, this workshop is most useful for those with a research project underway.

Statements of Teaching Philosophy: Writing

Increasingly, faculty positions in both research and teaching streams require a statement of teaching philosophy as one component of a teaching portfolio or dossier. Teaching statements reflect personal beliefs about teaching and learning, but also reflect disciplinary cultures and institutional structures in a particular context. Research shows that the central question the statement of teaching philosophy must address for readers is: Why do I teach? Furthermore, the statement of teaching philosophy must demonstrate how the pedagogical approaches are actualized in practice; that is, how concepts about teaching and learning are translated into action.

This workshop draws on research to introduce participants to some of the typical stylistic features of the teaching statement. As well, the workshop includes dedicated time for participants to revise a statement of teaching philosophy and receive feedback from the workshop facilitators and other participants. Therefore, the workshop is most useful for those with a draft of a teaching statement underway.

Writing in the STEM Disciplines

This workshop introduces researchers to the typical organizational structure of a research article in the STEM disciplines, while accounting for variation in disciplinary differences. That is, some conventions and features of academic writing remain constant across STEM disciplines, while others vary to account for discipline-specific norms and expectations of community members. The workshop facilitators draw on evidence-based research to identify some of the similarities and differences in style at both the macro- and micro-levels of the text.

The workshop includes dedicated time for participants to revise a section of a research article. Workshop facilitators and writing consultants from the Centre for Writing and Scholarly Communication are available for peer feedback on a draft. Therefore, this workshop is most useful for those with a research article underway.